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A U.S. Navy transporter carrying 11 people crashed into the Pacific Ocean off Japan on Wednesday. Search and rescue is underway for survivors, the Japan-based Seventh Fleet said in a statement. As of Wednesday morning, eight people had been found, Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera said, though "their condition is unclear," The Washington Post reports. Also unclear is the cause of the crash, which happened while the plane was traveling to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier.

This is the latest in a series of recent accidents for the Seventh Fleet, which is conducting exercises in response to rising tensions with North Korea. In June, seven sailors died when the USS Fitzgerald hit a container ship off the coast of Japan. And in August, 10 people were killed when the USS John S. McCain collided with an oil tanker near Singapore. Both incidents were considered avoidable and blamed on crew negligence, prompting new training exercises and examinations of how crew deal with stress and exhaustion. The Seventh Fleet commander, Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin, was removed from duty in August. Jessica Hullinger

November 21, 2017
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In October 2016, hackers stole the personal data of 57 million Uber customers and drivers, the company announced Tuesday.

Uber paid the hackers $100,000 to delete the data, which included names, email addresses, phone numbers, and in the case of some U.S. drivers, driver's license numbers. The company told Bloomberg they do not believe the information was ever used, and its chief security officer and deputy were let go this week for not going public with the hack.

"None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it," CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in a statement. "We are changing the way we do business." A spokeswoman for New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said he has launched an investigation into the hack. Catherine Garcia

November 21, 2017

Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) issued a statement Tuesday denying allegations that he fired a female employee after she refused to "succumb" to his "sexual advances." The woman ultimately signed a confidentiality agreement in exchange for a settlement of $27,111.75, which came from Conyers' office budget. Conyers admitted no fault as part of the settlement, and in the statement Tuesday he said: "In this case, I expressly and vehemently denied the allegations made against me, and continue to do so." Conyers added he would cooperate with an investigation if the House determined to look into the situation further.

Read his full statement below. Jeva Lange

November 21, 2017

Zimbabwe's president, Robert Mugabe, preempted impeachment proceedings by announcing his resignation Tuesday, The New York Times reports. Mugabe, 93, has ruled the nation since its independence in 1980.

On Sunday, the ruling Zanu-PF party ousted Mugabe as party leader. Mugabe stunned Zimbabweans by refusing to resign in a rambling televised speech. He said Tuesday that his decision to finally step down was out of concern for "the welfare of the people of Zimbabwe and the need for a peaceful transfer of power," and residents reportedly took to the street of Harare, the capital, to celebrate:

Emmerson Mnangagwa, who served as Zimbabwe's vice president until Mugabe fired him this month, was chosen as the new party head, but he had fled to South Africa for safety. Mnangagwa is expected to be Mugabe's successor. Jeva Lange

November 20, 2017
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On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick permanently blocked President Trump's executive order to cut funding to so-called sanctuary cities, calling it "unconstitutional on its face."

A sanctuary city limits its cooperation with the federal government in enforcing immigration law, and San Francisco and Santa Clara counties in California sued to block the order. Orrick, who previously put a temporary hold on the executive order, ruled that Trump cannot set new conditions on spending that has already been approved by Congress. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
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The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit to block AT&T from its controversial $85.4 billion grab at Time Warner, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. President Trump has long been critical of the deal, saying he believes it would focus too much of the power in the media industry in one company. The Justice Department's move could be complicated, though, because it will require convincing the courts "that the deal would threaten competition," Bloomberg Politics wrote earlier this year. "That could be tough because AT&T isn't buying a direct competitor."

The merger would have paired AT&T's wireless phone service with Time Warner's visual media, including networks like CNN, TNT, and HBO as well as the Warner Bros. film and television studio. Earlier this month, the Justice Department demanded CNN's parent company, Turner Broadcasting, be sold before the deal could go forward, raising questions about Trump's involvement in the decision.

"Vigorous antitrust enforcement by the Justice Department would ordinarily be a cause for celebration, given that antitrust law is the last line of defense for consumers when federal agencies go on the sort of deregulatory jihad that President Trump has directed," wrote the Los Angeles Times. "But in this case, it's impossible to tell whether the DOJ is being principled or a puppet. In fact, its motives are completely suspect."

Before the suit was officially filed, AT&T's general counsel said the move would be a "radical and inexplicable departure from antitrust precedent." Read more about the AT&T-Time Warner deal, and how Trump might have played a role, at The Week. Jeva Lange

November 20, 2017
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New York Times White House correspondent Glenn Thrush is accused of making unwanted advances on aspiring young female journalists, Vox reports. Formerly of Politico, Thrush, 50, is accused in one instance of paying for a colleague's cab in order to be left alone with Vox reporter Laura McGann. "He slid into my side of the booth, blocking me in," writes McGann of the incident, which she says took place five years ago. "I was wearing a skirt, and he put his hand on my thigh. He started kissing me."

In another account, from June 2015, a young woman at a bar with Thrush texted her friend, Bianca Padró Ocasio, from the bathroom: "I'm drunk," she wrote. "I'm nervous about this Glenn situation." The woman's friends urged her to get an Uber, but she reportedly left the bar with Thrush to get fresh air instead:

[Thrush] led her down an incline to a dimly lit path along the old C&O Canal bed. He kissed her, she says, and she panicked. Then her phone rang, jolting her. It was Padró Ocasio […] The young woman ordered an Uber — the receipt shows it was about 11 p.m. — and says she planned to call Padró Ocasio back once inside the car. In the few minutes she waited, she said, Thrush walked back over to her and started to kiss her again. She began to cry. When Thrush saw, he abruptly walked off, waving his hand flippantly, and left her alone to wait for her ride, she said. [Vox]

Thrush called the June incident "a life-changing event [for me]" and said that "over the past several years, I have responded to a succession of personal and health crises by drinking heavily." He added: "I have not taken a drink since June 15, 2017, have resumed counseling, and will soon begin out-patient treatment for alcoholism."

The New York Times says Thrush is suspended while the reports are investigated. Read more at Vox. Jeva Lange

November 20, 2017
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A second woman has come forward to complain about the conduct of Democratic Sen. Al Franken (Minn.), CNN reports. Lindsay Menz, now 33, claims Franken "put his hand full-fledged on my rear" when she posed with him for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010.

"It was wrapped tightly around my butt cheek," Menz told CNN. "It wasn't around my waist. It wasn't around my hip or side. It was definitely on my butt. I was like, oh my God, what's happening."

Menz's husband, who was taking the photo, said that while he could not see the contact his wife described because he was standing in front of the pair, he could confirm that Franken had "reached around [Lindsay Menz] and kind of pulled her into him." Menz posted the photo to Facebook and replied to a comment from her sister by writing: "Dude — Al Franken TOTALLY molested me! Creeper!"

Menz reached out to CNN after reporter Leeann Tweeden accused Franken last week of groping her in her sleep and kissing her without her consent while on a USO tour in 2006. Menz said of her own experience: "I felt gross. It'd be like being walking through the mall and some random person grabbing your butt. You just feel gross. Like ew, I want to wash that off of me."

Franken said in a statement that he did not remember the events Menz described. "I take thousands of photos at the state fair surrounded by hundreds of people, and I certainly don't remember taking this picture," he said. "I feel badly that Ms. Menz came away from our interaction feeling disrespected." Read the full report at CNN. Jeva Lange

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